Archive for November, 2013


Summary
A new scorpion species, Vaejovis trinityae sp. nov. is described. This small brown species is found along the Mogollon Rim above Strawberry, Arizona. This is the first description of a new species of the “vorhiesi” group scorpions whose DNA phylogenetic analysis was published (Bryson et al., 2013); based on DNA data, the new species is most related to V. lapidicola Stahnke and V. crumpi Ayrey et Soleglad. It represents one of the “twenty-seven geographically cohesive lineages inferred from the mtDNA tree”. A unique characteristic of this species is that it exhibits arboreal behavior, being frequently found on Ponderosa pine trees.

URL:  http://www.science.marshall.edu/fet/euscorpius/p2013_176.pdf

The scorpion genus Diplocentrus Peters, 1861, comprising more than 50 species, most of

The scorpion genus Diplocentrus Peters, 1861, comprising more than 50 species, most of which are endemic to Mexico, is the most diverse in the family Diplocentridae Karsch, 1880 (Santibáñez-López et al., 2011). Hoffmann (1931) divided the Mexican species into two groups, the whitei group and the keyserlingi group, based largely on differences in size and coloration. Francke (1977) redefined these groups. The whitei group, renamed the mexicanus group because it included the type species of the genus, comprised species with short cheliceral fingers and the pedipalp femur wider than high. The keyserlingii group comprised species with long cheliceral fingers and the pedipalp femur higher than wide. Several new species of Diplocentrus were since described, but no attempt was made to synthesize the taxonomy of the species assigned to either group or further clarify the validity of the groups. In the present contribution, the species of Diplocentrus with the pedipalp femur higher than wide are reviewed. An operational diagnosis is provided for the keyserlingii group. Diplocentrus formosus Armas and Martín-Frías, 2003, previously synonymized with Diplocentrus tehuano Francke, 1977, is reinstated. Revised, updated diagnoses are provided for all previously described species and three new species, Diplocentrus kraepelini, n. sp., Diplocentrus sagittipalpus, n. sp., and Diplocentrus sissomi, n. sp., are described. The female of Diplocentrus mitlae Francke, 1977, is described for the first time. A dichotomous key is provided for identification of the 10 species in the keyserlingii group.

Url:  http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/dspace/handle/2246/6438

centruroides11.06.13

 

Abstract

Centruroides franckei, n. sp. and Centruroides rodolfoi, n. sp. are described from Oaxaca, Mexico. These species belong to the(striped) group within the genus. Thirteen species of the genus are reported for the state, six of them belonging to the (striped)group (infamatus-nigrovariatus subgroup). Both new species are compared to their most morphological similar species. A map with the six (striped) (infamatus-nigrovariatus subgroup) species in the state is also provided.

Zootaxa 3734 (2): 130–140

URL:  http://www.mapress.com/zootaxa/2013/f/z03734p140f.pdf

 

coverbiojournal@linneansociety

Abstract

Geographical isolation can over time accumulate life-history variation which can eventually lead to speciation. We used five species ofVaejovis scorpions that have been isolated from one another since the Pleistocene glaciation to identify if biogeographical patterns have allowed for the accumulation of life-history variation among species. Gravid females were captured and brought back to the lab until giving birth. Once offspring had begun to disperse, measurements of female size, reproductive investment, offspring size, offspring number, and variation in offspring size were recorded. Differences in how each species allocated energy to these variables were analysed utilizing path analysis and structural equation modelling. Female and offspring size, litter size, and total litter mass differed among species, but relative energetic investment did not. Most significant differences among species were not present after removing the effect of female size, indicating that female size is a major source of life-history variation. Path analyses indicated that there was no size–number trade-off within any species and that each species allocates energy toward total litter mass differently. Additionally, as offspring size increased, the variation in offspring mass decreased. These results show that each species allocates the same relative amount of energy in different ways. The variation seen could be a response to environmental variability or uncertainty, a product of maternal effects, or caused by the sufficient accumulation of genetic differences due to geographical isolation. © 2013 The Linnean Society of London, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 2013, ●●, ●●–●●.

Online@http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bij.12162/abstract